More than 42,000 Comments Flood Oregon DEQ Opposing the Jordan Cove Fracked Gas Pipeline Project!

As of today, more than 42,000 comments were submitted to the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)! These comments overwhelmingly oppose the Jordan Cove fracked gas pipeline and ask DEQ to deny an important Clean Water Act permit that the project requires.

 More than 200 people rallied in Medford on August 16th to ask the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to deny the Clean Water Act permit required for the Jordan Cove fracked gas pipeline. Photo credit: Rogue Climate

More than 200 people rallied in Medford on August 16th to ask the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to deny the Clean Water Act permit required for the Jordan Cove fracked gas pipeline. Photo credit: Rogue Climate

Why is this project a bad deal for Oregon’s rivers?

Pembina, the Canadian corporation behind the Jordan Cove project, wants to construct the 229-mile Pacific Connector Pipeline and the Jordan Cove Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) export terminal located in Coos Bay on the Oregon coast. The proposed fracked gas pipeline would stretch across southern Oregon, cutting through more than 480 rivers and streams including the Rogue, Klamath, Umpqua, Coos, and Coquille Rivers. The proposed LNG export terminal would completely alter Coos Bay, harming habitat for fish, oysters, and clams.

If constructed, the Jordan Cove fracked gas pipeline project will:

•      Cut through at least 485 waterways and 6 miles of wetlands;

•      Trench, blast, dam, or drill at each stream crossing that will harm habitat for fish and increase pollution;

•      Remove streamside trees resulting in reduced shade and increased stream temperature;

•      Cross rivers and stream that provide public drinking water and private wells that could degrade public drinking water for at least 116,000 Oregonians;

•      Dredge Coos Bay to re-shape the bay for tankers resulting in destroyed fish and shellfish habitat; and

•      Increase ship traffic in Coos Bay, which will impact public access for fishing and recreation.

Why do these comments matter?

An unprecedented 42,000+ comments sent to DEQ demonstrates a strong and growing opposition to this harmful project here in Oregon. Together with partners and allies, we asked DEQ to deny a critical permit under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act required for the project to move forward. Under the Clean Water Act, each state has the authority to deny this permit for projects that would harm clean water. DEQ has denied permits for similar projects before because of their impact to rivers and streams. In 2010, DEQ denied this Clean Water Act permit for Bradwood Landing, an LNG export terminal and pipeline proposed on the Columbia River.

What’s next?

Now that the comment period is closed, DEQ will review the comments and likely will request more information from Pembina before making a decision on the permit. Get the latest updates and learn more about how you can help stop this harmful project!